What the heck am I talking about?

I have a few favorite pastimes when I am not writing a new book or imagining that I am rewriting someone else’s story in my head.  I  like to do needlework. Work with needles. No, I am not a philbotomist or a nurse or a heroin addict. I like to knit. So you ask, what the heck does this have to do with a writer’s blog.

Actually, kniters probably use first language shorthand language long before texting and twittering were born. For instance, a typical instructions would include something like; ssk, dyo, k3 p3 short hand for slip, slip, knit, double yarn over,  knit three, purl three. I love that stuff. I get the hang of it. I used it muchas veces (many times).  It is very cool. However, I need an urban dictionary to decipher lol, lmo, btw and mucho mas (much more).

Example of knitting pattern directions written by the designer.
. Work k2tog BO loosely as foll:
Sl 1 pwise wyf, bring yarn to back, return
slipped st to left needle, k2tog (2nd st tog
with slipped st), *

See what I mean?

All this brings me to what dictionary.com sent me the word of the day. Although I do not think I have seen or heard it before. I knew the meaning immediately. What is up with that? What makes my brain work like that? Amazing. I love this word more than btw or ssk. Well, maybe just as much. I want to share it with you today.

esemplastic [es-em-plas-tik, –uh m-]

adjective
1.

having the ability to shape diverse elements or concepts into a unified whole:

the esemplastic power of a great mind to simplify the difficult
Origin of esemplastic
German
Greek
1810-1820
1810-20; < Greek es-, dialectal variant of eis- into + ( h) én, neuter of heîs one + plastic; irregular coinage by S.T. Coleridge; compare German Ineinsbildung, term used by Schelling
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for esemplastic
esemplastic
/ˌɛsɛmˈplæstɪk/
adjective
1.
(literature) making into one; unifying
Word Origin
C19 (first used by Samuel Taylor Coleridge): from Greek es, eis into + em, from hen, neuter of heis one + -plastic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 201esemplastic
/ˌɛsɛmˈplæstɪk/
adjective

1.

(literature) making into one; unifying
Word Origin
C19 (first used by Samuel Taylor Coleridge): from Greek es, eis into + em, from hen, neuter of heis one + -plastic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Writers are intrinsically emplastic. We take many words and unify them into a story, or a memoir, or a movie. Another writer might take the exact same words. but write a different story. Writers transform the complexity of humanity and the world in which it function into an understandable form, a simplicity that makes sense of the complexity.
Does this make sense? Are you emplastic?  Do you want to be? What are your thought on writers being emplastic? Please share your comments. I love to read  them. BTW LOL
Sarina Rose on Amazon:http://amzn.to/1RySYwL

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