Romance & More

Loving Nick is a story of second chance love during the Vietnam War. Nick falls in love with Karen at first sight at college. She is different from the women he usually dates. She wears business suits, just a hint of make-up, and doesn’t smoke. Karen loved Nick’s raw edges and his wild spirit. They become partners in a secret messenger operation delivering information about the war to other government operatives. They married right after graduation against her parents’ wishes. She was eager to marry him, but on their honeymoon, she had second thoughts. She wondered aloud if they had made a mistake being so young. Nick is confident they had not. She secured employment with a magazine to begin a career. Nick volunteered for Vietnam without discussing it with Karen. Hurt feelings and difficult times follow.

Loving Nick will be available this coming summer. Does this cover and paragraph entice you? I would love to hear from you. Send me a comment.

Best Wishes from me to you!

Sarina Rose

http://www.sarinaroseauthor.com

http://www.facebook.com/sarinarose

My books on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2qG59D9

 

 

 

 

My Favorite Gifts

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From my title are you thinking that I am musing about favorite gifts I have received? To some extent I am. It is difficult to say or write the word gift and not think of the favorite ones that my favorite people have given me. Those came from the people I love, from my parents, my aunts and uncles.

I still have my favorite. It’s a picture taken of my Uncle Charlie in his Army uniform. He sent it with a dollar for my birthday during World War II. He looks handsome and young. I remember him that way. He never grew old for me. I do not even remember his hair turning grey or thin. I remember him on the beach reading his newspaper. He would take the train from Newark to the Jersey Shore.

But what do I love to give, you ask? Ah, I do love to give gifts, all kinds of gifts. My favorite for children under the age of twelve are books.All kinds of books, even magazines, like National Geographic or Highlights. Yes, and puzzle books: dot to dot or crosswords.Anne of Green Gables and Vampire books by Anne Rice for my daughter and granddaughters.

I loved to give my Mother jewelry and now I have some it. Nothings very valuable, but very sentimental. It seems I gave her two purple bead necklaces. I have both handing on a necklace stand in my bedroom. I also have a broach or two and a pendant. The pendant was given to her by her mother-in-law. I think it was an engagement gift. Now that I have a great-granddaughter, I am thinking of giving it to her

I have always loved to give gifts I make myself. I think I learned that in Brownies or Girl Scouts. We were always making something. One Christmas we sewed old Christmas cards together to make baskets. When in high school, we had a knitting club, Mrs.V. encourages us to knit socks. I made a pair for my Dad. I loved those socks. He did too, but I don’t think he ever wore them.  Arygles. A niffy tricky knitting pattern. My friend could never get the knack of knitting and has her socks still on the knitting needles.

I still knit.This year I made a white sparkly infinity scarf for a sort of grab bag party game, three boys scarves, a capelet and three fancy hats. Here are pictures of quilts that I have made and given as gifts.

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  What are  your favorite gifts to give? Do you make some? Bake? Buy? Upcycle?

Love you all. I praying you have a joyful Christmas, a Happy Hannaka and a peaceful New Year!

Sarina Rose      Sarina Rostek

What the heck am I talking about?

I have a few favorite pastimes when I am not writing a new book or imagining that I am rewriting someone else’s story in my head.  I  like to do needlework. Work with needles. No, I am not a philbotomist or a nurse or a heroin addict. I like to knit. So you ask, what the heck does this have to do with a writer’s blog.

Actually, kniters probably use first language shorthand language long before texting and twittering were born. For instance, a typical instructions would include something like; ssk, dyo, k3 p3 short hand for slip, slip, knit, double yarn over,  knit three, purl three. I love that stuff. I get the hang of it. I used it muchas veces (many times).  It is very cool. However, I need an urban dictionary to decipher lol, lmo, btw and mucho mas (much more).

Example of knitting pattern directions written by the designer.
. Work k2tog BO loosely as foll:
Sl 1 pwise wyf, bring yarn to back, return
slipped st to left needle, k2tog (2nd st tog
with slipped st), *

See what I mean?

All this brings me to what dictionary.com sent me the word of the day. Although I do not think I have seen or heard it before. I knew the meaning immediately. What is up with that? What makes my brain work like that? Amazing. I love this word more than btw or ssk. Well, maybe just as much. I want to share it with you today.

esemplastic [es-em-plas-tik, –uh m-]

adjective
1.

having the ability to shape diverse elements or concepts into a unified whole:

the esemplastic power of a great mind to simplify the difficult
Origin of esemplastic
German
Greek
1810-1820
1810-20; < Greek es-, dialectal variant of eis- into + ( h) én, neuter of heîs one + plastic; irregular coinage by S.T. Coleridge; compare German Ineinsbildung, term used by Schelling
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for esemplastic
esemplastic
/ˌɛsɛmˈplæstɪk/
adjective
1.
(literature) making into one; unifying
Word Origin
C19 (first used by Samuel Taylor Coleridge): from Greek es, eis into + em, from hen, neuter of heis one + -plastic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 201esemplastic
/ˌɛsɛmˈplæstɪk/
adjective

1.

(literature) making into one; unifying
Word Origin
C19 (first used by Samuel Taylor Coleridge): from Greek es, eis into + em, from hen, neuter of heis one + -plastic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Writers are intrinsically emplastic. We take many words and unify them into a story, or a memoir, or a movie. Another writer might take the exact same words. but write a different story. Writers transform the complexity of humanity and the world in which it function into an understandable form, a simplicity that makes sense of the complexity.
Does this make sense? Are you emplastic?  Do you want to be? What are your thought on writers being emplastic? Please share your comments. I love to read  them. BTW LOL
Sarina Rose on Amazon:http://amzn.to/1RySYwL